PAN 2020 — Online Presentation

Art Fair - Modern Art - Contemporary Art

Raoul Dufy (1877-1953)
’La Terrasse à Vallauris’, 1927

Signed lower right ‘Raoul Dufy’
Oil on canvas
31 1/2 x 38 3/4 in, 80 x 98.5 cm

Provenance
Galerie Flechtheim, Germany Private Collection, USA

Literature
Paris, Fanny Guillon-Laffaille & Maurice Laffaille, Raoul Dufy, Catalogue raisonné de l’oeuvre peint, Supplément, Éditions Louis Carré et Cie, 1985, illus. p.53, no.1869

Raoul Dufy made a number of paintings from the small village of Vallauris during the 1920’s when he travelled frequently from Nice to the surrounding areas along the Côte d’Azur. Like countless other artists at this time, including Henri Matisse, Dufy was drawn to the unique quality of light in the south. This new vibrant palette greatly impacted Dufy’s practice and helped to formulate the pure colour and fluid, energetic line that characterised his mature style. Following Dufy’s sojourn in Vallauris, the village itself became a centre of creative activity with the first annual ceramics exhibition in 1946 and the arrival of Picasso, who lived in the village from 1948 to 1955.

‘La Terrasse à Vallauris’ is one of several paintings that capture the panoramic views of the coastline, gardens and aquamarine sea from a pavilion overlooking the village. In each of these works (an example of which can be found in the Bührle Foundation, Zürich), Dufy highlights the columns and archways in a rich cerulean blue that seeps beyond the outlines of the structure to evoke the radiant warmth of the south. As Gertrude Stein, the poet, writer and art collector explained, “Dufy is pleasure. Think of the colour and it is not that and the line and it is not that, but it is that which is all together and which is the colour that is in Dufy”. Having recently returned from his travels to Morocco in 1926, the arched vistas of the Vallauris terrace and details such as the patterned tiles and multi-coloured dots also reveal the artist’s new found interest in oriental decoration.

‘La Terrasse à Vallauris’ was previously in the collection of the legendary German art dealer Alfred Flechtheim.

Alexander Calder 1898-1976
’Sans titre’, 1970

Signed, dated and dedicated lower right ‘à Ray & Jeanne Sutter Sandy Calder 70’
Gouache on paper
29 1/4 x 43 1/8 in, 74.3 x 109.5 cm

Provenance
Collection of Raymond and Jeanne Sutter (gifted by the artist)Private Collection, Paris Galerie Carole Brimaud, Paris Private Collection (acquired in 1992)

Literature
This work is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York under number A28063

This lyrical painting by Alexander Calder was made in 1970, a year after the artist’s magnificent new studio ‘Le Carroi’ was completed in the small village of Saché in the Loire Valley. Establishing himself in this idyllic region of France during the 1950s, Calder quickly became a valued member of the Saché community as he hired local craftsmen and commissioned the nearby Tours factory to help construct his famous mobiles and stabiles.

Calder often dedicated works to close friends and colleagues. In this particular case, the inscription reveals that ‘Sans titre’ was gifted to Calder’s direct neighbours in Saché, the artist Ray Sutter and his wife Jeanne. Sutter had first moved to the Saché valley after the liberation of Paris where he took inspiration from the Touraine landscape in his radical designs for stained glass and abstract painting

Lynn Chadwick (1914 – 2003
)
’Sitting Couple II’, 1980

Inscribed ‘Chadwick’, dated ’80’ and numbered ‘797 1/9’

Bronze

18 x 36 x 27 1/8 in, 45.7 x 91.4 x 68.6 cm

Cast at Burleighfield as a numbered edition of 9

Provenance

Private Collection, USA (acquired directly from the artist on 7 September 1981)

Literature

Dennis Farr & Eva Chadwick, Lynn Chadwick: Sculptor, With a Complete Illustrated Catalogue 1947-2003, Lund Humphries, 2014, no.797, illustration of another cast p.344 . Eva Chadwick has confirmed that this cast is recorded in the artist’s archives

Lynn Chadwick is one of the most important and respected sculptors that came to prominence in Britain in the post-war years. Having exhibited alongside Henry Moore, Reg Butler and other young sculptors at the pivotal New Aspects of British Sculpture exhibition in 1952, Chadwick went on to fully establish his reputation when he won the International Prize for Sculpture at the Venice Biennale in 1956. 



‘Sitting Couple II’ marks a revival in Lynn Chadwick’s late work of sitting or standing pairs. Often seated on a bench and facing forwards, these couples move away from the light-hearted intimacy of Chadwick’s earlier work in favour of a more composed quality that conveys internal emotion through the slightest change of form. Far from ‘The Geometry of Fear’ which art historian Herbert Read had coined to define the British sculptors of the 1950s, these couples evoke the intricacies of human relationships.



In this series Chadwick develops a visual code for the figure, in which the male is always shown with a square head and the female with a triangular. These late couples also build upon the dynamism of Chadwick’s Jubilee works, made during the 1970s in honour of the Queen’s Silver Jubilee. In this series of dynamic figures driving against the force of the wind, Chadwick uses billowing material to suggest volume and movement. In ‘Sitting Couple II’ Chadwick similarly uses taught folds of drapery to convey the curve of the breast and haunches of the shoulders that evoke the gender of each figure. 



Working from his own foundry, Chadwick was able to explore the potential of bronze as a medium in his mature career, pioneering new techniques for welding and construction. Chadwick rejected the smooth, direct-carved forms of Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore to create a rougher textured skin. Using phosphoric acid (commercial rust remover) Chadwick could control the tactile finish of his cast bronze sculptures and separate himself from what he considered to be the greasy shine of green and black patinas. In 1981 Chadwick suffered a heart attack and was forced to adopt the help of several studio assistants. While this was a quieter period for Chadwick, with little interaction from the press, Chadwick continued to work with unflagging momentum. In 1985 he was awarded the Officier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French government. 



Lynn Chadwick’s work can be found in the collections of major international museums including the Tate, London; National Museum of Wales; Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art; Musee Nationale d’Art Moderne, Paris; Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice; Galleria Nazionale d-Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Rome; Museum of Modern Art, New York; and the Smithsonian Institute, Washington, DC.

Sonia Delaunay (1885-1979)
’Rythme couleur’, 1962

Signed lower left ‘Sonia Delaunay’; numbered lower centre ‘F971’
Gouache and charcoal on paper
16 1/8 x 15 1/8 in, 41 x 38.5 cm

This painting has been sold

Provenance
Private Collection, France Sale: Artcurial, Paris, 30 May 2012, lot 41 Private Collection (acquired from the above sale)

Literature
The authenticity of this work has been confirmed by Richard Riss.

The art of Sonia Delaunay transcended the boundaries between fine and applied arts. Refusing to be categorised within the historically feminine notion of ‘craft’ art, Delaunay paved the way for many female artists. Apart from painting she experimented with tapestry, fashion, costumes for theatre and films and set design. Considered an integral part of the Parisian avant-garde in the early 20th century – alongside her husband the French painter Robert Delaunay – Delaunay developed the artistic movements Orphism and Simultanism.

In 1912-13 the art critic, Guillame Apollinaire, first used the term Orphism to distinguish the Delaunays’ work from cubism generally. Deriving from the Greek poet and musician Orpheus, Apollinaire used the name to express the musicality and harmony of the Delaunays’ colour compositions. Although Apollinaire was a friend and collaborator of Delaunay, Orphism was not a term they used, preferring to define their work as Simultanism. The idea of Simultanism was born from Michel Eugène Chevreul’s book De la loi du contraste simultanée des couleurs. It used the notion that when complementary tones are together they ‘simultaneously’ enhance each other’s intensity.

‘Rythme Couleur’ is characteristic of Delaunay’s later paintings which had greater formal freedom in their rhythmic patchwork of abstract, bright forms. The strong primary and secondary colours vibrate off each other giving the work an emotional vitality. Delaunay created a large series of Rythme Couleur throughout her career. These works stand as a testament to her continual experimentation into the language of colour and ‘pure’ painting.

Born into a Jewish family in Ukraine in 1885, Delaunay studied in St Petersburg before travelling to Germany and Paris. Surrounded by the stimulus of contemporary German Expressionists, Fauves and Post-Impressionists including Gauguin and Van Gogh, Delaunay was driven to experiment with colour which she described as “the skin of the world”. Delaunay developed this fascination with colour and design through a number of creative outlets, but increasingly turned to painting following the death of her husband in 1941.

During the 1960s and 70s, Sonia Delaunay began to receive international recognition as she became the first living female artist to exhibit at the Louvre, just two years after creating Rythme Couleur in 1964. 114 works by herself and her husband were donated to the Musée National d’Art Moderne, Paris and she was awarded the French Legion of Honour (1975). Since her death in 1979, Sonia Delaunay has been the subject of major retrospectives around the world including Tate Modern in 2015, which was the first of its kind in the UK.

Sonia Delaunay (1885-1979)
’Rythme couleur’, 1962

Signed lower left ‘Sonia Delaunay’; numbered lower centre ‘F971’
Gouache and charcoal on paper
16 1/8 x 15 1/8 in, 41 x 38.5 cm

This painting has been sold

Provenance
Private Collection, France Sale: Artcurial, Paris, 30 May 2012, lot 41 Private Collection (acquired from the above sale)

Literature
The authenticity of this work has been confirmed by Richard Riss.

The art of Sonia Delaunay transcended the boundaries between fine and applied arts. Refusing to be categorised within the historically feminine notion of ‘craft’ art, Delaunay paved the way for many female artists. Apart from painting she experimented with tapestry, fashion, costumes for theatre and films and set design. Considered an integral part of the Parisian avant-garde in the early 20th century – alongside her husband the French painter Robert Delaunay – Delaunay developed the artistic movements Orphism and Simultanism.

In 1912-13 the art critic, Guillame Apollinaire, first used the term Orphism to distinguish the Delaunays’ work from cubism generally. Deriving from the Greek poet and musician Orpheus, Apollinaire used the name to express the musicality and harmony of the Delaunays’ colour compositions. Although Apollinaire was a friend and collaborator of Delaunay, Orphism was not a term they used, preferring to define their work as Simultanism. The idea of Simultanism was born from Michel Eugène Chevreul’s book De la loi du contraste simultanée des couleurs. It used the notion that when complementary tones are together they ‘simultaneously’ enhance each other’s intensity.

‘Rythme Couleur’ is characteristic of Delaunay’s later paintings which had greater formal freedom in their rhythmic patchwork of abstract, bright forms. The strong primary and secondary colours vibrate off each other giving the work an emotional vitality. Delaunay created a large series of Rythme Couleur throughout her career. These works stand as a testament to her continual experimentation into the language of colour and ‘pure’ painting.

Born into a Jewish family in Ukraine in 1885, Delaunay studied in St Petersburg before travelling to Germany and Paris. Surrounded by the stimulus of contemporary German Expressionists, Fauves and Post-Impressionists including Gauguin and Van Gogh, Delaunay was driven to experiment with colour which she described as “the skin of the world”. Delaunay developed this fascination with colour and design through a number of creative outlets, but increasingly turned to painting following the death of her husband in 1941.

During the 1960s and 70s, Sonia Delaunay began to receive international recognition as she became the first living female artist to exhibit at the Louvre, just two years after creating Rythme Couleur in 1964. 114 works by herself and her husband were donated to the Musée National d’Art Moderne, Paris and she was awarded the French Legion of Honour (1975). Since her death in 1979, Sonia Delaunay has been the subject of major retrospectives around the world including Tate Modern in 2015, which was the first of its kind in the UK.

Prices of the Artworks above are avaible on request: Rene Bruijstens - contact@bruijstens-art.com PAN